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Author Topic: Update on fish caught at Valletta Waterfront.  (Read 1616 times)
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Arti2
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« on: December 27, 2010, 10:53:02 CET »

Profs. Patrick Schembri sent me this e-mail regarding a fish that was caught at the Valletta waterfront.

Dear All,

About a year ago, we had corresponded on a new alien fish, the barred knifejaw, Oplegnathus fasciatus, that had suddenly appeared in local waters. You had provided me with data on the fish, photographs, and information on many aspects of how a fish of this type that originates from the Far East can find itself in Malta. The scientific paper on this fish and on how it may have travelled to Malta has just been published and I attach a copy. My colleagues and I are very grateful for all the help that you have provided us with and your contribution has been acknowledged in the paper. I hope you will find this report interesting.

Again thank you for your help and I take this opportunity to wish you, and your loved ones, a peaceful Christmas and a successful and healthy New Year.

Patrick Schembri


http://www.aiep.pl/volumes/2010/1_2/pdf/01_1014_P_2_FULLTEXT.pdf
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Arti2
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« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2010, 11:04:11 CET »

Profs. Patrick Schembri also sent me another e-mail:

'As I think I told you before, part of my present research is concerned with the changes that are taking place in the Mediterranean as a result of the warming trend in surface waters that has been ongoing for the last few decades. As a result of this, marine species that were previously confined to the East Basin are moving westwards and species from the warm water Atlantic and from the Red Sea are entering the Mediterranean from the Strait of Gibraltar and from the Suez Canal, respectively. Moreover, species that are cold-adapted are disappearing from the southern Mediterranean as it warms. Other effects are population blooms of certain species and mass deaths of others. Any occurrences of this type that your members report would be very interesting to me. Note that I do not read the Forum so if any reports are posted, I would be very grateful if you could alert me.'

So forum members will be helpful if they report anything unusual -- it is through reports from people who are in constant contact with the sea that I and other scientists are alerted to new occurrences that we then follow up with scientific research.

Anyone encountering anything unusual can post pictures together with size, time of year and place which may help alot for research. And I will inform Profs. P. Schembri whom will kindly provide useful information.
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Arti2
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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2011, 12:56:02 CET »

Feedback from Profs. Patrick Schembri:

The short report on the Barred Knifejaw was uploaded today on the University research website -- see
http://www.um.edu.mt/research/scienceeng/barred_knifejaw/_nocache
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placebo
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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2011, 15:29:06 CET »

thanks mate ..... for good follow up ... great
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Arti2
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« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2011, 08:24:04 CET »

Last e-mail update from Prof. P. Schembri:

'The article on the Barred Knifejaw that I had sent you is featured on the 'frontpage' of the Unviversity website this week. Go to http://www.um.edu.mt/ and you will see it under the 'News' heading. To access the article itself, go here http://www.um.edu.mt/newsoncampus/researchinitiatives as the link given on the website is wrong (I have told them about this so they should correct it shortly). You may wish to bring this to the attention of the Malta Fishing Forum owner as well as the article mentions the forum as I promised.'


So now the article has been transferred to:

http://www.um.edu.mt/newsoncampus/researchinitiatives
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suffrun
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« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2011, 08:31:28 CET »

very interesting indeed.
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camel10
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« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2011, 09:46:20 CET »

As usual very interesting information which i suggest to the moderators to give it more weight and more prominence as like this information more fishermen learn about the fish and the surrounding and thus it will help indirectly in conservation and how we shall approach the environment. 

Special thanks goes to the academics that find time to pass on this invaluable information.

Camel10
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1988 Albatross 390, Tohatsu 30 4 Stroke
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